Tag Archives: learning

Book Review: Two New eBooks for Kids

I’m lucky to be connected with folks who create books in non-traditional, cutting-edge ways. A couple of them have created some pretty neat new ebooks, and I wanted to share these with you.

The Monarch Butterfly: An Interactive Picture Book by Liz Castro

With the plethora of information available about the Monarch butterfly, you’d think there’d be nothing left to say about these fascinating creatures. After spending over an hour with Liz Castro’s new iBook The Monarch Butterfly: An Interactive Picture Book, I’ve decided that this assumption is wrong.

Clearly a labor of love for Castro, this book is fantastic and pushes the boundaries of what an iBook can do. Each page features lovely and detailed full-color photos, some taken very close up. There are informative captions too, but these are hidden behind yellow arrows, so that the reader can pull them out when/if needed, or enjoy the photos alone.

Also included are amazing time-lapse photos presented as videos, showing different parts of the creature’s life cycle, such as a very hungry caterpillar munching on a milkweed leaf and the magic of transformation as the butterfly makes its way out of its chrysalis. These are set to classical music and are a perfect example of appropriate use of the format–in this case, to inform and engage.

Definitely worth the price at $4.99, the well-done interactive features of this iBook make it very app-like. Highly recommended for teachers, librarians, parents and anyone wanting to get a closer look at a very interesting insect.

Are We Lost? by Annie Fox, illustrated by Eli Noyes

AreWeLost

Remember Raymond and Sheila? These are brother-and-sister alligators I wrote about when they first appeared just over a year ago in their first book Are You My Friend? by Annie Fox. In this new installment titled Are We Lost?, the two head to the beach for some summer fun. Before long, Raymond is ready for some ice cream, and with his big sister’s approval, he heads off to get it. As you might imagine, what seems so simple never is, and misadventures (and a little bit of chaos) ensue.

I love the tone Fox takes with these books. She seems to understand that what usually seems like no big deal to adults often looms larger than life for kids, and her handling of shyness and other common childhood fears is respectful and empowering.

The illustrations are again done in a colorful, fun-loving style by Eli Noyes, and there is a parent guide at the end to initiate discussions with your own kids.

Available soon for the Kindle, Are We Lost? is a cute, reassuring story for young readers.

(Full disclosure: I received electronic copies of both books for review purposes.)

Apps I Like: Speak for Yourself

I’m working on a Master’s degree in elementary/special education, and as a project for my Intro to Exceptionalities class, I put together this video presentation about (guess what?) an iPad app. This one is called Speak for Yourself, and it is a language assistance app for non-verbal individuals.

I admit I first heard about this app after reading an article in the Huffington Post about a patent infringement lawsuit a company called PRC slapped on the Speak for Yourself developers. As a result of the ongoing litigation, Apple made the controversial decision to (temporarily?) remove Speak for Yourself from the App Store. Read the HuffPo, TIME and Cult of Mac stories which ensued, and (if you are so inclined, as I was) sign the online petition designed to get Apple to reinstate the app while the matter is played out in court.

Planet Pouch is FREE Today!

Planet Pouch

My little craft book is FREE today!

Today is my birthday, and to celebrate, I decided to make Planet Pouch FREE today. So please: if you are reading this, go straight to Amazon.com and get yourself a copy, post a review and help me spread the word.

Planet Pouch: Simple Juice Pouch Bags Anyone Can Make is a craft how-to book that shows you how to turn those shiny juice pouches into fun bags and totes using a simple sewing machine. Tons of full-color photos and step-by-step instructions make the process easy.

And if you don’t have a Kindle, no problem. You can use the free Kindle Cloud Reader and read this (and thousands of other) ebooks on your computer.

Thank you, and have a wonderful Father’s Day!

Print Books vs. Ebooks

IKEA Library

Dream library, IKEA version

As long as I can remember, I’ve had the dream of one day owning a house big enough to hold a room with a dedicated library of all my books, complete with one of those rolling ladders to allow me to reach the high shelves. This dream personal library has a velvet chaise lounge with a beautiful bronze floor lamp next to it, and a fireplace, bear rug, the whole luxurious nine yards.

I made a startling realization the other day: if we abandon the fantasy of the chaise lounge/floor lamp/fireplace, I’ve already got the dream library, since I have more than 600 books in my Amazon Kindle Cloud Drive and more than 200 iOS apps, half of them book apps.

Dream library, Kindle version

I write this post today because I’ve been hearing the following statement lately, from a variety of people:

“I like ebooks and all, but I prefer the feel of a real book in my hands.”

While I don’t really care if these folks hold on to their dead tree books as long as they like, I think they’ll eventually change their minds. Here’s why.

Ebooks Are Convenient

Between all my gadgets (Android phone, two iOS devices and a Kindle Touch) I have access to hundreds of books (many obtained free, or at discount prices) in my favorite genres. I send cookbooks, craft books and other how-to or multimedia books to the Kindle Reader on my iPad; mysteries, business books, chick lit and other text-based books I want to read soon to the Kindle Touch, and the rest (books I may want to read someday) to the Kindle Cloud Reader, which effectively stores them in the cloud for free. I use the Kindle Reader on my phone when I don’t have access to one of my other reading devices and I’m unexpectedly caught with an extra few minutes in my day. I like having my library accessible anytime, anywhere–I don’t have to be on the velvet chaise lounge after all.

Page turns are managed with a single touch to the right-hand side of the screen, and I can get to any place in the book easily, within a couple of touches.

Ebooks Enhance the Experience of Reading

I love the ability to touch a word I don’t know and get the definition instantly. I love that the Kindle system keeps my place no matter which device I’m using. I also love the way many of the book apps I have for my kids not only hold their interest but encourage literacy and retention through interactive features (one company that does this especially well is Oceanhouse Media with word highlighting and the ability to hear a word aloud when it’s pressed in their storybook apps).

Ebooks Are Lighter and Easier to Maneuver

I’ve been reading the Song of Ice and Fire series by George R. R. Martin. Because I am a cheapskate, I decided to read the third book (A Clash of Swords) in paperback, since I found it at my local used bookstore and purchased it with store credit. This book, in mass market paperback form, is heavier and bulkier than my Kindle Touch and won’t stay open without my propping it with a heavy object, so it’s difficult to hold with just one hand. I like the fact that I can store all the ebook versions of the others in the series (and hundreds of other books) on a single device that weighs less than the small-format paperback.

Ebooks Are Less Wasteful

Lately when I hold a print book, especially a hardcover, I’m hit with the overwhelming feeling of wastefulness. There’s something pretty unpleasant about the fact that the book I hold in my hands is a real, tangible slice of what used to be a living thing, processed and assembled for the sole purpose of my entertainment or learning. I offset this as much as I can by taking physical books I don’t want anymore to my local used bookstore, then offering the ones they don’t want on PaperbackSwap.com, but the fact is: printed books use up resources (paper, ink, glue and more) that no longer need to be expended for the same entertainment or educational value.

Ebooks Can be Updated Much Faster, and at Less Cost

Non-fiction books in print form eventually become outdated. Information changes and evolves as humans gain more knowledge about a topic, or when materials or ways of doing things are improved. But let’s be honest: most non-fiction print books will be truly useful for only a fraction of their lives. After that, the next edition replaces it–at significant cost. Textbook publishers have profited from this with great success for many years–at the expense of both teachers and students.

It’s time for ebooks to become the preferred way to distribute educational materials and other non-fiction content, which can be updated quickly and redistributed almost instantly, to all users of the material, with no expending of the tangible resources needed to print a new edition.

However, Ebooks Aren’t Perfect

For me, the five reasons above are pretty compelling for the shift to digital. But there are some things about ebooks I don’t like as well. These shortcomings aren’t enough to send me back to paper, but they are worth mentioning:

  • The Kindle ‘Farthest Page Read’ Feature Needs a Reset Button. The ability of Amazon’s Kindle devices to keep my place is great, but occasionally I accidentally make my way to a later page that doesn’t actually reflect where I am in the book. When this happens, keeping my place manually becomes a pain in the neck. I’d love to see a way to reset this, but I imagine it won’t happen, since the addition of this feature would make it much easier for spouses and other family members to share books on the same family of devices. But since I let my kids and spouse share my print books, I’d sort of like to share my ebooks with them too, in a hassle-free way. Come on, Amazon!
  • Prices of Ebooks from the Big Publishers are Too Expensive. Books coming from the big 6 publishers are priced according to their artificial and rapidly-crumbling world of print scarcity and their hardback-to-trade-paperback-to-mass-market-paperback release schedule. This is archaic and needs to change. Why should the ebook version of a title ever cost more than the mass market paperback would? It all comes down to greed, and an over-reliance of the old way of doing things. Eventually these outdated practices will put many of these publishers and retailers (remember Borders?) out of business.
  • Ebook Lending Needs to Be Improved. It’s nice that I can lend one of my Kindle books to someone else (if the publisher allows it), but I can only do it once. After that, the book can’t be lent again. I don’t mind the restrictions of one-person-at-a-time and my own inaccessibility during the lending period (since these are in force for my print books too) but let’s remove the artificial restriction of once only, and let me lend a book I’m finished with over and over if I choose.
  • Ebook Devices Aren’t Durable or Affordable Enough. When iOS devices and other ebook readers are able to withstand normal wear and tear by school-aged children (i.e. being dropped on the floor) and are cheaper than $50, we will see a true revolution. Until then, they aren’t practical enough to replace most of the printed books in my house, which are now children’s books. Plus an entire segment of the population (the lower middle classes and below) have little to no access yet.

So, what I’m saying is: in spite of the drawbacks, ebooks have become just as ‘real’ to me as print books are. I love them both, but I’m not buying many print books anymore. And eventually (probably within the next five years or so) most of the rest of you will be saying the same thing.

Apps I Like: My Little Pony by Ruckus Media

I have to come clean here. As a parent of two young girls, I am often on the lookout for stories that provide strong female characters and feature empowering, not stereotypical situations. Therefore I frown on, but do not forbid, traditional pink/princess/fluffy stuff like Barbie, the Disney princesses and (gulp) My Little Pony. However, I know both my girls love My Little Pony, and I thought the new app from Ruckus Media deserved a chance at my house. Could it take advantage of the format and provide an experience beyond simple entertainment?

My Little Pony by Ruckus Media

My Little Pony - Twilight Sparkle: Teacher for a Day by Ruckus Media

The app is centered around a My Little Pony story called Twilight Sparkle: Teacher for a Day which I suspect comes from the television show. The story is straightforward enough, and features Twilight Sparkle’s adventure after she is asked by Princess Celestia to share a history lesson with the Cheerilee students about Equestria.

My Little Pony story

The story features all the ponies your child knows from the show and the toy figures.

Word highlighting is included when the ‘Read to Me’ option is selected on the main screen. I think this is a must-have feature for a storybook app and I’m glad to see it here.

There are also little short videos that pop up between pages here and there that follow the story, as well as little bits of hot spot animation that are fun the first few run-throughs but don’t add a whole lot to the experience.

Sprinkled throughout the story are optional activities like mazes and spot-the-difference panels. Completing these correctly wins the reader words, which can be used to fill in the blanks in Twilight Sparkle’s diary. Best of all, there are several of the randomly-generated activities, so kids don’t get bored when going back to try to earn all the words.

My Little Pony maze

Finishing the activities earns you words, which you use later on to complete several pages of Twilight Sparkle's diary.

The diary is my favorite feature of this app, because it could be used to help kids hone reading comprehension skills. The reader uses the words collected along the way to fill in the blanks in the diary. Tapping on a single word reads it to you, and once you’ve placed all the words in their proper spots you have the option to read the entire diary.

My Little Pony diary

Use the words earned by doing the activities to complete Twilight Sparkle's diary.

Of course, you can place any word in any blank you wish–which provides a fun Mad Libs-style wacky reading, if you desire. I admit I felt a little rebellious doing this!

The main theme of the story (friendship and working together leads to great things) is hard to miss, but I liked the secondary theme even better (it’s OK if you’re not great at everything–ask a friend to help you out). And for my youngest daughter who loves all things girly, I’m happy anytime she chooses to interact with an app that aids literacy, even if pink princess pony parties are involved.

Bottom Line: Great production values and familiar characters add up to a solid, if unsurprising, app experience. If your kids like My Little Pony, they will love this app. Reasonably priced in the App Store at $3.99, and the app is universal (designed for both the iPhone and iPad).

(Full disclosure: I received  a free copy of this app for review purposes.)

T-Shirts from Goodie World!

goodie world tees

The girls and I showing off our new shirts from Goodie World!

I’ve been wanting to show off these cool new t-shirts I won in a Twitter giveaway a while back, but vacation and a few other diversions kept getting in the way.

Do you guys know about Goodie World? This is a team of talented developers who are creating gorgeous learning apps for kids. Goodie Words, their first release, is a nifty little app that explains some common, but perhaps intangible or otherwise hard-to-explain, concepts/words for preschool kids.

I downloaded and tried out the free version of Goodie Words and loved it. First-class artwork and engaging interactivity make for a very endearing, useful and fun app, designed especially for the iPad.

According to their website, Goodie Shapes and Goodie Letters are in development right now–can’t wait to see what they’ve got in store for us. Thanks, guys,  for the awesome shirts (and cool apps)!

Interview with Gary James, Creator of a4cwsn.com

Do you remember the videos shown during the iPad2 launch? While I was mesmerized by the fun factor of the device, I was really touched by the way the iPad is being used to help kids with autism. It’s amazing to me that the tablet is helping these kids develop skills and gain independence.

When I connected with Gary James, founder and creator of the Apps for Children with Special Needs site, I was truly impressed with his effort to build a resource for parents and caregivers of special needs kids. He agreed to an interview, which I’m delighted to share with you today.

Apps for Children with Special Needs

the a4cwsn home page

1. Although it’s getting a lot of exposure now, the idea that mobile apps could help kids with autism and other special needs probably wasn’t as evident a year ago when the iPad was introduced. How did you discover that apps for kids could benefit these children?

A. Well, I have always been interested in electronics, computers, video games, big TVs–just like every other guy out there, but the real wake up was when my son was diagnosed with special needs. Ever since that day, I have always looked for ways to help him and also teach myself how to help others. So I have had a Mac for 10 years now and when the iPad came out, I was ready to go, knowing that this could be an amazing new way for our children to interact with a product that can help them develop mentally. Touch was the key.

2. The Apps for Children with Special Needs site (a4cwsn.com) seems like a godsend for all parents, not just those adults who support special needs kids. The app index of videos alone is extremely valuable. Did you have certain ideas in mind when you created the site, or did it evolve over time?

A. I created the site to help families like mine find apps that were useful for certain things, and at the same time show them how the apps worked so they would not waste their money if it was not what they needed. The site is evolving very, very fast. I am in the process of putting together categories unique to special needs children that will make it possible to search by therapy categories also. So if someone needs help with speech or AAC, for example, they will be able to see all the apps in those categories from 99¢ up to $350 on video before spending any money.

3. I love the JaMeos: video previews of storybook apps that can be digested in Just a Minute. With no commentary or voice over review, it’s just a brief walk-through of the beginning of a storybook app. What gave you the idea for this approach?

A. I came up with this idea after reading a story on my iPad by a company in England called Story Mouse. Their apps took me back to my childhood, when I had three TV channels and it was all about imagination and great storytelling. I think if people want to buy a book, it should start out with a good story, much like when you want to see a movie, you watch the trailers first and then decide what to do. My brother actually came up with the name as our last name is James and the clips are like cameos, thus Jameos and the abbreviation JAM worked well for Just a Minute.

4. I’d imagine that the community of parents and caregivers of special needs kids would be pretty choosy about the resources they use. What sort of feedback have you received on the site and on the tools you’ve provided?

A. I get amazing amounts of feedback from all over the world, the video podcast I provide to iTunes under Special Needs is ranked in the top 5 podcasts in over 40 countries. So I get ideas of what is missing, what people like and don’t like, apps I should look at and not look at, you name it and I hear it. I must say that most of the feedback about the site is very positive, parents telling me how much time and money I have saved them. This is why I started it in the first place.

5. I notice you’re also active on Facebook and Twitter. Have you found that social media makes it easier for people in the special needs community to connect with needed resources, and each other?

A. Twitter is a great way to get a message out to millions of people, but what I have found is that they really have to be interested in what you are saying and doing. The main issue with Twitter seems to be that people just want to have large numbers following them and don’t really care what or when they say things. Facebook, on the other hand, is much more personal. Pictures and information about interests similar to yours seem to bring together communities of great people. We recently held a Facebook party to celebrate some great developers and gave away over 300 amazing apps to people who otherwise may not have had the opportunity, including an app worth $500 and another one worth $200. What happened with the numbers was amazing, the amount of times my posts were read came to something like 600,000 in a 24 hour period. Now that is good marketing!

6. As a writer/illustrator myself, I have a big need to enrich the lives of others. Knowing that there is a possibility that special needs kids could benefit through one of my stories is extremely gratifying. What caused you to become involved with the special needs community–and have you found your work on the a4cwsn site gratifying as well?

A. I love what I do and I hope others do also. I got involved because of my children. #6 is due any day now and my other five are the reason I get up every morning. My eldest is 18 and now has special needs. Benjamin who just turned 6 is also on the spectrum so I will never stop, I will never give up and I will do all I can to help anyone who needs it.

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Make sure you both bookmark the Apps for Children with Special Needs site (a4cwsn.com) and Like them on Facebook. I understand Gary is gearing up for another app giveaway extravaganza soon! Thanks to Gary for his thoughtful responses.

Apps I Like: Two French Apps

While the rest of the world was in England last week for the royal wedding, I was in the French Alps! er, I mean Apps. I had a chance to try out two nifty French-themed kids apps, and I think you’ll like them too.

Word Wagon by Duck Duck Moose

Word Wagon: Kids spell words by dragging the letters in place.

The first app is Word Wagon by Duck Duck Moose, an award-winning developer of educational game apps for kids. This app is all about spelling words and is designed for youngsters just learning to read. A cute little rodent named Mozz lives under the Eiffel Tower (and he wears a beret!). He and his bird friend Coco guide kids through each word.

I really liked the artwork, French-themed music and animation, and I also like the fact that the letters are mentioned by name and pronounced as they should sound in the word. When the word is formed correctly, it is spoken and then the word is collected in the wagon.

Kids can see how many words they’ve formed, and along the way they collect stars which can be used to form constellations. There are four levels of difficulty in the app, which is nice because each of my two kids can enjoy the app at their own ability level.

While definitely an educational app, Word Wagon is well designed and makes learning spelling and phonics fun. It’s $1.99 and is designed for the iPhone, although it looks great at 2x on my iPad.

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GoKids Apps: Save Paris! is a clever app for older kids by Fun Educational Apps. You are tasked with saving Paris from evil alien invaders who are focused on ‘Glooping’ everything in sight!

Your mission is to learn about France and Paris, and then use your new knowledge by pairing facts with their definitions in a match card game. If you miss too many it’s Game Over. If not, you’ll be rewarded with a fun ‘whack-a-mole’ game, where the object is to tap on the aliens as fast as they pop up.

I admit I went through only the first three missions of ten. The material covered is wonderfully comprehensive and includes geography, language, culture, history and more. This would be a fantastic resource for kids 8-12, especially those who are visiting France, taking French or doing a unit on France in geography or history class. But the alien invasion theme and the game action would probably draw kids back just for that aspect of the app.

With high-quality art, music and gameplay, GoKids Apps: Save Paris! is a crash course in French culture sandwiched between top-secret missions to defeat green Gloop aliens. What’s more fun than that? Find it in the App Store for $1.99.

(Full disclosure: I received a copy of each of these apps for review purposes.)

Interview with Digital Storytime’s Carisa Kluver

the Digital Storytime site

a recent review at Digital Storytime

If you have an Apple mobile device and small kids, you probably a) look for well-made apps that are both educational and fun; and b) like to get good deals on those apps. Digital Storytime was created with both those needs in mind, and is turning into a must-bookmark site for busy parents like me. I was able to snag a few minutes of time with Carisa Kluver, Digital Storytime‘s creator/founder, who cheerfully agreed to answer my nosy questions!

Carisa Kluver, Digital Storytime's creator

Carisa Kluver, Digital Storytime's creator

1. As both an educator and a parent, you come at the concept of digital literacy from two valid perspectives. Tell us a little bit about your background. When did you realize that the iPad could be used as a digital bookshelf for your kids?

I spent the past 20 years working with children, youth and families in a variety of roles. I have a BA in Anthropology and an MSW, spending most of my career teaching health education to adolescents & training teachers, often for after-school programs to prevent teen pregnancy. I still do contract work occasionally, training teachers for a comprehensive sexuality education curricula series called Our Whole Lives. Before I left the workforce to have my little boy 5 years ago, I had settled into research work on teen pregnancy prevention and was even published in an academic journal. [That article took 6 years to see publication, so every time I push the ‘publish’ button on the blog, I think, “Now that’s instant gratification for a writer.”]

When my 40th birthday rolled around in April 2010, my plans to celebrate in Vegas seemed a bit beyond our budget, so I ‘splurged’ on a 16GB wifi iPad instead. Within a month I was downloading kids books. I was a little stunned at how revolutionary the change in my own reading routine was with my own child. I am a lover of print kids books and never liked digital books on computers. My nieces & nephews make jokes about how I only send them books for every gifting opportunity–so much so that they would be stunned to get anything else from me. I never thought I’d be willing to transition from print to digital–let alone so quickly.

2. Digital Storytime is quickly becoming the site of choice for parents who want information and reviews of storybook apps for the iPad. What made you want to create the site?

Long before the idea for our site, I loved finding good iPad kids books. But the shopping experience was dreadful. The kids books aren’t even separated out from the erotica in the app store. I also couldn’t afford my growing book app habit without serious bargain shopping. By October I had amassed over 100 book apps by watching sale promotions very closely. That’s when the idea to start my own site hit me. I was also talking to our local children’s librarian about the book apps and trying to describe them. She just looked confused and had never heard of these books. When I explained that they have no ISBN numbers, she was even more mystified.

At the same time, I was getting a crash course in marketing. I was trying to help out my husband’s Android kids game, Dash & Ditto’s Playground, and in the process I spent a lot of time on app review sites for both Android & iOS kids apps. I wanted a way to really search and sort through information and tried to find something like that for kids books for the iPad. Of course such a site simply didn’t exist. My husband needed a database project for a class he was taking in php, so I gave him a project … a big one. 😉

3. I love how each app is rated on six different metrics (Animation, Audio Quality, Interactivity, Re-Readability, Extras and Bedtime)–I find this very helpful when I evaluate apps for my own kids. Have other parents responded to the site? What sort of feedback have you been getting?

I have gotten wonderful feedback from almost everyone – from parents & educators to authors/illustrators and even developers themselves. Parents in particular have said the site is a ‘godsend’ even. It makes me blush a little. 🙂

We are also in the process of several big makeovers for the pages on our site. The response to the first page to change, the deal page, was great. We really appreciate the specific feedback … things like the different colors for free and paid apps on the buttons came from a reader suggestion.

We actually have two more categories I rate books on, Originality & Educational, that will debut with our site makeover later this month (May).

4. The Daily Deal page is a fantastic, time-saving resource for those of us who have limited funds (and who doesn’t?). Educational and book apps show up there whenever the price drops below their regular retail price (including FREE)! How did you get the idea for this great feature?

My friends know me for being notoriously frugal. My deal-finding abilities in the non-digital world are legendary. In order to start the review site I needed lots of good books to choose from to fill the site quickly with reviews. I didn’t get promo codes for books at first, so I was industrious about finding free deals and watching for price drops on chart topping books. I even started following lots of developers on twitter to hear about deals more quickly. Once I started getting promo codes, I decided to turn this bargain hunting into the deal page to share my finds. At first, I just figured a couple good friends would download stuff … but it turns out the things I wanted in a site were things lots of parents & educators wanted too.

5. There is some controversy about the use of screens for reading with children instead of traditional printed books. As an educator and a parent, what are your thoughts on moving storytime into the digital age?

This is a complicated issue. I do have concerns about screen time. That’s why I added the blog, The Digital Media Diet. Everything is about balance, mindfulness and being present as a parent (both literally and figuratively). I also think all screens (and content) are not created equally. I use my child’s behavior as feedback … if he is zombie-like and whiny after getting to play with an app, I can tell it is the kind of screen time that needs to be a treat, not the digital meal.

I expect there will be some growing pains as our society adjusts to digital kids books. I don’t get the controversy though. I guess I just don’t think we can do anything to stop this trend. The transition seems to be happening faster than anyone expected, though. The costs of printing (in financial and environmental terms) are simply too great in comparison to the ease of digital publishing and downloading. And that’s even without the extra features that make picture books come alive. Once you’ve walked through this particular door, you can’t go back. (IMHO)

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A big thanks to Carisa for helping me out with the blog today! If you’ve never visited Digital Storytime, the Daily Deal page or the Digital Media Diet blog, head on over there and check it out! You can Like them on Facebook too.

Help Choosing Family-Friendly Apps

Did you hear Steve Jobs last week at the iPad2 launch? He reported that there are 350,000 apps in the App Store, with 65,000 optimized for the iPad. Sort of mind-boggling, isn’t it? If you are trying to find high-quality, family-friendly apps for your device, it makes sense that you might need a little help (I know I do).

The developer community at Moms With Apps (of which I am a proud member) has created a special FREE app to help narrow down the choices.

The app is wonderful and features screenshots and write-ups of more than 600 family-friendly apps, sorted by educational category and age groups. Regular updates of the app will mean that the database stays current. Download yours FREE today!